Jazz Crossroads of America: Birth of the Cool, Birth of the School

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HISTORIC MOMENTS TO MONUMENTAL MUSIC. MUSIC. ♪ ♪ ♪ ♪ ♪ ♪ >> THE DAWN OF THE 1960s WAS >> THE DAWN OF THE 1960s WAS RIPE FOR REVOLUTION.

RIPE FOR REVOLUTION. THE CIVIL RIGHTS MOVEMENT THE CIVIL RIGHTS MOVEMENT SPARKED DEBATE ABOUT  CULTURAL DIVIDE AND IN TOWNS ACROSS DIVIDE AND IN TOWNS ACROSS AMERICA,

INTEGRATION TOOK HOLD. AMERICA,  FOR INDIANA AVENUE, THE EMMY FOR INDIANA AVENUE, THE EMMY EPICENTER, THE END OF FORCED EPICENTER,

THE END OF FORCED SEGREGATION LED TO DOWNTOWN EXPANSION AND THE ONE DYNAMIC EXPANSION AND THE ONE DYNAMIC CORRIDOR DISAPPEARED.

YET 60 MILES SOUTH, SOMETHING WAS STIRRING AT INDIANA WAS STIRRING AT INDIANA UNIVERSITY’S SCHOOL OF MUSIC.

IN THE 1950s, STUDENTS AND AND MUSICIANS SUCH AS DAVID BAKER, DAVID BAKER, ALC OUABAIN AND JERRY COKER  was PLAYING JAZZ AROUND TOWN AND  AND AROUND CAMPUS. AROUND CAMPUS.

Trained as a music educator and trombonist, Baker spent the early part of his career in the 1940s and 1950s as a jazz musician, performing and recording in the United States and in Europe. A facial injury suffered in an automobile accident in 1953 ended his career as a trombonist, but Baker switched to cello and turned his attention to teaching and musical composition. In 1966 he joined the music faculty at Indiana University in Bloomington, where he established the school’s jazz studies program. He was later named an IU distinguished professor and chair of the university’s Jazz Studies department in the Jacobs School of Music. In addition, he became one of the co-musical directors of the Smithsonian Jazz Masterworks Orchestra in 1991. He composed music, mostly on commission, and wrote hundreds of scholarly works related to music. He was active in numerous musical arts organizations.[2][4]

THE MUSIC THREATENED  TO INFILTRATE THE HALLOWED CLASSICAL SOUNDS OF THE SCHOOL.

STUDENTS WERE THEN  THROWN OUT OF PRACTICE ROOMS FOR DARING  TO PLAY JAZZ.

THE CHANGING POLITICAL AND SOCIAL CLIMATE OF THE 1960s,  HOWEVER, PROVIDED AN UNEXPECTED OPENING  FROM THE HIDDEN CAMPUS CORNERS TO THE HIDDEN CAMPUS  I.U. MUSIC HALLS. IT WAS THE SUMMER OF 1963,  WHEN 250,000 CIVIL RIGHTS SUPPORTERS GATHERED AT THE STEPS OF THE LINCOLN MEMORIAL, LISTENING  TO DR. MARTIN LUTHER KING,  DREAM OF A BETTER WORLD.

DREAM OF A BETTER WORLD.

WITHIN THE DECADE, HE WOULD BE DEAD. DEAD.

> I HAVE A DREAM TODAY.

>> I HAVE A DREAM TODAY.

>> BUT HIS LEGACY WOULD  SEND A RIPPLE THAT WOULD STRETCH FROM RIPPLE THAT WOULD STRETCH FROM D.C. TO BLOOMINGTON . AS DAVID BAKER EXPLAINS, ALL OF ALL OF A SUDDEN, THERE WAS THIS INTEREST  IN DIVERSITY AT THE DEGREE LEVEL.

DIVERSITY AT THE DEGREE LEVEL SCHOOL WAS JUST BEGINNING TO BE INTEGRATED AND SO CONSEQUENTLY PEOPLE BECAME VERY INTERESTED IN HAVING SOME AWARENESS OF WHO BLACK PEOPLE WERE.

THE JAZZ HISTORY COURSES  WERE BEGINNING TO GAIN  CREDIBILITY. INTEREST MEANT NEW  FOUND SUPPORT, AND BY 1968,  INDIANA UNIVERSITY FORMED  ONE OF THE FIRST JAZZ DEGREE PROGRAMS IN THE COUNTRY.

ALL THAT THE UNIVERSITY NEEDED WAS A LEADER, AND FOR THAT THEY TURNED TO A MAN ROOTED IN INDIANA JAZZ, DAVID BAKER

DAVID BAKER. BORN IN INDIANAPOLIS IN 1931, BAKER GREW UP  ALONG INDIANA AVENUE AT A TIME WHEN  THE COMMUNITY STILL BUZZED  TO THE BEATS OF JAZZ MUSIC.

AT THIS HIGH SCHOOL, BAKER  DISCOVERED HIS LOVE FOR  DIZZY GILLESPIE AND CHARLIE PARKER AND HIS NATURAL TALENT FOR TROMBONE.

IT WAS OUTSIDE THE CLASSROOM WALLS WHERE BAKER HONED HIS  CRAFT.

AS HE EXPLAINED, EDUCATION  TOOK PLACE IN THE STREET. WE WOULD GO AROUND TO THE CLUBS  LISTENING AND TRYING TO GET IN. BECAUSE WE WEREN’T OLD ENOUGH WE PUT ON OUR BERETS AND HORN-RIMMED GLASSES AND  DRAW MUSTACHES ON OUR UPPER LIP  AND HOPE IT DIDN’T RAIN.

THE DAVE BAKER QUARTET, LEFT THE AVENUE FOR THE  WORLD OF INDIANA UNIVERSITY, WHERE HE GRADUATED WITH A MASTER’S DEGREE IN MUSIC IN 1954.

OVER THE NEXT DECADE HE TOURED WITH SUCH LEGENDS AS GEORGE  RUSSELL AND QUINCY JONES.  A DEVASTATING CAR ACCIDENT, HOWEVER, DRAMATICALLY ALTERED BAKER’S CAREER AFTER LINGERING INJURIES FORCED  HIM TO ABANDON HIS TROMBONE, HE HIM TO ABANDON HIS TROMBONE, HE SOUGHT A NEW MUSICAL OUTLET. IT A WAS UNLIKELYCHOICE WAS THE CELLO BUT THE NEW INSTRUMENT INSPIRED NEW MUSICAL Shiftin HIS gFOCUS  FROM PERFORMANCE TO COMPOSITION  AND EDUCATION.

BY 1966, BAKER  RETURNED TO INDIANA UNIVERSITY TO COMPLETE HIS DOCTORAL STUDIES. HIS DOCTORAL STUDIES. THE TIMING WAS SYNCHRONISTIC, JERRY COKER WHO PLAYED AN INSTRUMENTAL ROLE IN THE BIRTH  OF JAZZ EDUCATION AT INDIANA UNIVERSITY, SOUGHT A SUCCESSOR TO LEAD THE NEWLY FORMED JAZZ PROGRAM.

BAKER’S UNIQUE COMBINATION  OF STREET CREDIBILITY AND FORMAL STREET CREDIBILITY AND FORMAL EDUCATION MADE HIM THE PERFECT CANDIDATE FOR THE NEXT TEN YEARS,BAKER ACTED AS SOLE EDUCATOR, ACTED AS  ESTABLISHING FUNDAMENTAL  COMPONENTS THAT WOULD LEAD THE PROGRAM’S OVERWHELMING SUCCESS.

SUCCESS. FIRST, HE DEVISED A DIVERSE FIRST. THE STUDENTS COULD CHOOSE THE STUDENTS CLASSES IN SUCH SUBJECTS  AS JAZZ HISTORY, JAZZ ANALYSIS AND THE HISTORY THE EVOLUTION OF MUSIC.

IN ADDITION,  THROUGH HIS COMPOSITIONS, BAKER HELPED  BRIDGE THE GAP BETWEEN JAZZ AND CLASSICAL TRADITIONS,WRITING PIECES THAT MERGED GENRES IN THIRD STREAM, STRENGTHENING  THE RELATIONSHIP WITH CLASSICAL MUSIC FACULTY MEMBERS.

MUSIC FACULTY MEMBERS. FINALLY, HE CREATED A PROGRAM FINALLY, HE CREATED A PROGRAM THAT’S ABLE TO ADAPT QUICKLY. THAT’S ABLE TO ADAPT QUICKLY. AS BAKER EXPLAINED, WE HAD TO AS BAKER EXPLAINED, WE HAD TO KEEP OUR EARS TO THE GROUND KEEP OUR EARS TO THE GROUND BECAUSE TONIGHT BEEN DICTATED BY BECAUSE TONIGHT BEEN DICTATED BY WHAT THE STUDENTS NEED BUT ALSO WHAT THE STUDENTS NEED BUT ALSO LOOKING BACKWARDS AND TELLING LOOKING BACKWARDS AND TELLING THEM THIS IS YOUR LEGACY, BUT THEM THIS IS YOUR LEGACY, BUT YOU CAN’T STOP HERE. YOU CAN’T STOP HERE.

♪ ♪ THE PROGRAM’S LEGACY HASN’T STOPPED EITHER.  TODAY THE I.U. JAZZ STUDIES JAZZ STUDIES PROGRAM REMAINS ONE OF THE  MOST RENOWNED IN THE WORLD, PRODUCING RENOWNED NUMBER OF NOTABLE JAZZ Musicians Many of his students became giants of jazz themselves, including Jamey Aebersold, Jim Beard, Chris Botti, Michael and Randy Brecker, John Clayton, Peter Erskine, Jeff Hamilton, Freddie Hubbard, Robert Hurst and Shawn Pelton.

Indiana University mourns David Baker, distinguished professor and jazz legend…

BLOOMINGTON, Ind. — The Indiana University Jacobs School of Music is deeply saddened to announce the death of David N. Baker, distinguished professor of music and Jazz Studies Department chair emeritus, at the age of 84.

Baker died peacefully Saturday, March 26,2016 at his home in Bloomington, Ind. A member of the Jacobs School of Music faculty since 1966, he founded the Jazz Studies program and served as its chair from 1968 to 2013.Read more

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